11 AprChemical Science Graduate SeminarZoom Webinar: How Nature Activates the C-H Bond in Methane: Lessons from a Combination of Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry
Zoom Webinar: How Nature Activates the C-H Bond in Methane: Lessons from a Combination of Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry
  • Professor Frank Neese
  • Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung
  • Sunday, April 11, 2021
  • 12:00 PM - 01:00 PM
  • KAUST, VIA ZOOM, CLICK OR COPY THE LINK BELOW
2021-04-11T12:002021-04-11T13:00Asia/RiyadhZoom Webinar: How Nature Activates the C-H Bond in Methane: Lessons from a Combination of Spectroscopy and Quantum ChemistryChemS Graduate Seminar Zoom Webinar: How Nature Activates the C-H Bond in Methane: Lessons from a Combination of Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry Professor Frank Neese Max-Planck-Institut für KohlenforschungKAUST, VIA ZOOM, CLICK OR COPY THE LINK BELOWAliyah Fakimaliyah.fakim@kaust.edu.sa

Please click the link below to join the webinar:

https://kaust.zoom.us/j/91705285830


Abstract: Transition metals are of vital importance in the active sites of metalloenzymes where they catalyze the most demanding reactions known in chemistry with remarkable efficiency and selectivity under the mildest chemical conditions. One of the dream reactions in organic chemistry is the selective oxidation of unactivated C-H bonds. In biochemistry, this task is accomplished by a number of iron and copper-containing metalloenzymes. However, the activation of methane is not only the most challenging of these reactions but also one of the biochemically most important. Major efforts have been invested in understanding from a mechanistic perspective how methane mono-oxygenases accomplish this difficult task. We have recently re-investigated this important problem through a combination of high-level spectroscopy and quantum chemistry. The results shed new light on the structure of the key intermediate known as intermediate Q 


Biography: Born 13.12.1967 in Wiesbaden. From 1987 - 1993 studies of biology (Diploma 1993); 1997 Promotion at University of Konstanz. 1997 - 1999 Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford University (California, USA); 1999 - 2001 Habilitation (Bioinorganic und theoretical chemistry) at the University of Konstanz; 2001 - 2006 group leader at the Max Planck Institute for radiation chemistry (since 2003 Max Planck Institute for Bioinorganic Chemistry); 2006 - 2011 Full Professor and Chair of Theoretical Chemistry at the University of Bonn. In addition from 2008 - 2011 Fellow of the Max Planck Society and since 2011 Director and Scientific Member at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion. Since 2013 Honorary Professor at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität of Bonn. As of 1st January 2018, he is Director and Scientific Member at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung.

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  • Aliyah Fakim
  • aliyah.fakim@kaust.edu.sa

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